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Variations in root canal anatomy patterns are in focus in a new study that is being jointly conducted by students from two Indian dental colleges. (Photograph: crystal light /Shutterstock)
0 Comments May 29, 2017 | News Asia Pacific

Study analyses unique root canal anatomy patterns in Indian population

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NAVI MUMBAI, India: Provisional findings of an Indian study have suggested that the root canal anatomy of Indians might differ from those of other ethnicities, and hence they may require adapted care during root canal therapy. The study, which began two years ago, is being jointly conducted by researchers at two local dental colleges, Terna Dental College and the Government Dental College in Mumbai.

Under the supervision of college deans Drs Shishir Singh and Mansingh Pawar, about 20 students involved in the research project have been investigating 5,000 teeth that were provided by dental colleges and hospitals in the region.

The results showed that the anatomy of the mandibular canines and second premolars was more complex than that of teeth from other ethnicities. For example, the investigators found that the extra mesiobuccal canal often seen in European, Thai and Japanese populations was rare in the Indian maxillary molars examined. In addition, Indian teeth showed root canal anatomy patterns that were different from those seen in American and African teeth. Consequently, the researchers concluded that Indians might require special care during dental treatment in order to ensure treatment success.

Explaining the tooth preparation process, Singh said that the teeth are cleaned and disinfected before the root canals are accessed and dye is injected into them. After drying and decalcification, the specimens are dehydrated in ascending concentrations of methanol, Singh told the Times of India. “The students study the specimens under special halogen lighting and the root canal anatomy is classified using internationally accepted classifications,” Singh explained regarding the research method.

The study is ongoing and the researchers hope to make further findings, Singh said.

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