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News Middle East

People who have a severe fear of the dentist are more likely to have tooth decay or missing teeth (Photograph: King's College London)
0 Comments Sep 14, 2017 | News Middle East

Phobia of dentists leads to more decay and tooth loss

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People who have a severe fear of the dentist are more likely to have tooth decay or missing teeth, according to a new study from King’s College London.

The study, published in the British Dental Journal, compared the oral health of people with and without dental phobia. The results showed that people with dental phobia are more likely to have one or more decayed teeth, as well as missing teeth. In addition, the study found that those with dental phobia reported that their quality of life is poor.

In the study, researchers suggest that this could be that because many people with dental phobia avoid seeing a dentist on a regular basis to address preventable oral conditions. The team also found that once a visit has been made, the phobic patient might also prefer a short-term solution, such as extraction, instead of a long-term care plan.

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